Use Twitter or Facebook? Pro Tennis Players

Use Twitter or Facebook? Pro Tennis Players

When comparing professional tennis players statistics on Twitter and Facebook, it would seem personalities and lifestyles influence which one the player prefers. Some players have more followers on Twitter versus Facebook and some have more Facebook followers than on Twitter.

Twitter

Serena Williams and Andy Roddick have far  more followers on Twitter than Facebook. Juan Martin del Poltro and Stan Warinka have more Twitter followers than on Facebook, but not as big a difference as Williams and Roddick. It would appear the biggest reason is their lifestyle and personality. They prefer the interaction of Twitter over that of Facebook. Tweeting after winning or losing matches gives fans immediate feedback on their players experiences, which seems to suit these players personalities and lifestyles.

In a previous blog I referred to the betting crowd and how negatively they tweeted when their player lost. The players listed here would fall into the category of winning more matches and tournaments than losing, thus possibly not opening themselves up to large numbers of negative tweets. The personalities of these players are also conducive to tweeting more about what is happening in their lives. They seem to tweet much more often and their followers increase accordingly.

Facebook

Rafael Nadal, Roger Federer, and Maria Sharapova dominate in their Facebook followers. versus their Tweet followers. They do update their fan pages on Facebook from time to time but their postings on these fan pages on Facebook are not as prevalent as those that tweet. This seems to provide more stability to their followers/fans. These updates, sometimes accompanied with video, also allow comments from the fan base and allow a longer interaction period than tweets. The players personalities and lifestyles would seem allow a more protective side to their private lives, while still providing interaction with their followers that supports their image and business interests.

Conclusion

Twitter has about one-fifth the users of Facebook. Facebook fans spend an average of 25-30 minutes on Facebook compared to approximately 8 minutes on twitter. Another point is that a tweet does not last as long. It is here and gone with the tweeter moving on with their followers leaving those present tweets in the past. In today’s age of social media interacting with professional tennis players, it is interesting to match up the statistics of player’s usage of either Twitter and Facebook. In most cases other than those discussed above, the followers almost even out with a slight advantage to Facebook.

Analyzing your personality and lifestyle, would you rather interact with Twitter or Facebook in your social media presence?

 

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Facebook-Affects Professional Tennis

Facebook-Affects Professional Tennis

Facebook has a huge impact on professional tennis – on the players, on the fans, on the professional tournaments, and on the various businesses associated with the sport. In the third quarter of this year Facebook listed 1.79 billion active users on a monthly basis in 2016.

Facebook and the players

Any tennis professional can create a player page.

The professional tennis players with the most likes on Facebook are:

#1 Maria Sharapova 15,497,777 likes

#2 Rafael Nadal 14,693,292 likes

#3 Roger Federer 14,552,388 likes

#4 Novak Djokovic 7,216,289 likes

#5 Serena Williams 4,953,674 likes

Interesting how at #7 is Anna Kournikova with 3,419,774 likes. She had to retire in 2007 due to injuries, but has still retained a high visibility with her Facebook page, thus showing the impact Facebook can have on a players career, even after retiring.

Facebook and the Fans

When a player such as Roger Federer has a Facebook page fans can link up to it and participate in the time line as well. As the player posts about a tournament or a ‘cameo’ in his/her post the fans can take note and share it with their friends and family. Fans become a part of the player they are identifying with. It brings a ‘luster’ to their own lives as they see their hero succeed or fail in their endeavors. Without this facebook interaction fans could not have the in-depth knowledge facebook provides.

Facebook and Profesional Tennis Tournaments

Professional tennis tournaments such as Indian Wells Tennis Garden can also have a facebook page which gives them wide exposure to the tennis population. Having this provides a venue to publicize players coming to the tournament and the businesses associated with the tournament. Players post about the tournament on their own timelines. This only adds to the excitement and participation of the fans in the tournament. The more successful the tournament the better it is for the players, fans, and the tournament sponsor as well.

Facebook and the Sponsors

Sponsors such as Nike can also have a Facebook page. This serves to publicize the tournament, the players equipment, and only adds to their exposure and sales. When they post pictures of the player(s) endorsing their equipment it is amazing to think of the population Facebook reaches.

Conclusion

There is no comparison with present day Facebook and non-Facebook days. Facebook provided visibility, in terms of a player’s profile, fans interacting with their favorite players, tournament publicity and sponsors selling their product. It is available to all and can even be used to ‘set up’ a player’s career after their playing days are over.

If you were a world class player would you manage your Facebook account yourself of hire a management company. Remember, once it is open to the public there is no taking it back.

 

 

 

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Twitter Affects Professional Tennis

Twitter Affects Professional Tennis

Twitter affects professional tennis in both a positive and negative way.

Positives

Signing up for a twitter account immediately gives the player access to the outer world of spectators and fans, which affects their image. For example, with the recent Hurricane Mathew, a player who tweeted a donation, either in money, or time, or ‘siding with the victims’, would be perceived in a positive light. To better illustrate this, more in line with a players ‘on court’ matches, a player who exudes a positive attitude towards the ballboys, chair umpire, and spectators would further his self-image and possibly, develop a larger following. A tweet with positive vibes for the athlete’s sponsored clothing, shoes, or racket would go far in attracting other sponsors and be positive publicity for his own sponsors. Along with twitter is a players picture. The picture alone can elicit positive reactions, with the player looking athletic, alert and personable.

Negatives

The latest negative result of how twitter can affect a players image is Nick Krygios. Not only was he suspended for 8 weeks (so far he has not agreed to the counseling offer which would drop it to 3), but he lost approximately $40,000.00 in fines, and a Malasia Airlines sponsor.  Krygios is such a talented player and fun to watch, but not when he is disrespectful to spectators (who pay to watch), and his sponsors (who pay for his endorsement of their product) by displaying unattractive character traits. Even after apologizing with a tweet his ensuing behavior did not seem to indicate a ‘humbler’ Nick Krygios. He is still only 21 and after two of these ‘sanctions’ hopefully will respond and turn to a more positive image on court and on Twitter.

Conclusion

Twitter is a force to be reckoned with when professional athletes sign up for an account. Tennis players are perceived as both intelligent and informed. How they word their tweets (picture included) ‘to the world’ can improve their publics and sponsors perception of them.

How would you handle your twitter account if you were a successful professional tennis player (athlete)? Would you hire a publicist or do it yourself?

 

 

 

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Social Media Affects Professional Tennis

 Social Media Affects Professional Tennis

Social media has both a positive and a negative affect on professional tennis. In assessing their joining up with social media such as facebook, twitter and instagram, professional tennis players are opening themselves up to interaction with their fan base, or, the unsavory arena of the ‘gambler’. This can have either a positive or negative feedback, many times depending on the result of the day – winning or losing.

Winning

The saying goes, ‘everyone loves a winner’ and it is true in both cases cited above. The fans of a particular tennis player and those who place bets on the same player are both positively reinforced when their player wins. The fans get to tell their friends how they are aligned with a winner and the gambler gets to collect his/her winnings. Both are winners.

Losing

The saying also goes, ‘everyone hates a loser’. This also tends to be true in both cases. Those fans who have their favorite player lose also tend to feel the effects of losing and ‘take it to heart’. The gambler has a much stronger sense of losing as it is, ‘money out of his/her pocket’. In some (many?) cases, money they don’t have.

There are other applications of a professional tennis players results that are affected. Their endorsements and appearance fees. The more positive a player is perceived the more money they are paid for endorsements, or appearance fees. An appearance fee is paid up front to the athlete to appear/play at a particular tournament. This is paid regardless of the players results in that tournament. Obviously, if they do well in the tournament they make that money as well. However, the appearance fee is paid to advertise the players participation which attracts paid spectators. As far as the endorsement fees paid by sponsors the more positive the social media perceives a player, the more sales are made by the sponsor which results in higher fees paid to the player.

Conclusion

Professional tennis players have the option of either signing up or not signing up for social media. Signing up means opening up to a world of positives and negatives – the negatives even going so far as death threats. Athletes go through stages of success and failure. Tennis players are no different. Depending on the country they come from and their exposure to the social population their results can have a greater or lesser effect on their personal lives. This can certainly affect their personal ‘world view’ and either add or detract from their continued performance in the world of professional tennis.

Would you sign up on social media if it meant going so far as receiving ‘death threats’?

 

 

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Fatigue-Tanking in Tennis

Fatigue-Tanking in Tennis

Emotional or/and physical fatigue can be linked to tanking in tennis. Fatigue can be defined as extreme tiredness, typically resulting from mental or physical exertion or illness. Tanking is defined as losing a match on purpose; or to purposely lose a non-vital set, so as to focus energy and attention on a match deciding set.

Fatigue

With the recent Kyrgios match in our minds, where he was fined and may face suspension, fatigue is a factor that should be considered. While Kyrgios did not handle his match and spectator situation with diplomacy, he is young and growing every day in his ability to handle life situations that come at him. His learning curve is huge right now as he tries to figure out who and where he is in life. Should he have a coach. Should he continue to play tennis when he considers a career in another sport. However, in the present, he has made great strides in his upward mobility with regard to his ranking and success in recently winning a major tournament. To do all this requires a price to be paid on his part. Factored in is the fatigue-both emotional and physical he has gone through to reach this place. Given the huge effort he has made in training, playing, traveling, etc. it seems to have come to a head on the tennis court in this particular match. How he handled it was not gracious, or mature. However, perhaps he should be given a break on the suspension due to his inexperience in handling this. He has shown growth and learning in previous sanctions. Each one is bigger and draws more attention as he accelerates his own personal best.

Tanking

Tanking is taken seriously at the professional (even the amateur) level. When the finances are added up at the end of a tournament it should show black, not red. Spectators pay to watch the professionals play. A knowledgeable crowd understands when a player is subjected to fatigue and are willing to put up with it as long as an effort is put out by the player, even though sub-standard. Kyrgios is fun to watch. He is talented, movement blessed, and makes it look easy at times. Because of his upward movement in ranking and the visibility that comes with it, Kyrgios is held to a higher standard. Perhaps fatigue entered at the wrong moment and he didn’t handle it in the right way. I would suggest putting him on notice, as they did before, and on further occurrence, follow through with a suspension. I hope this isn’t the case as I enjoy watching him as a player and a person who is growing up through tennis.

Conclusion

Tanking is not in ‘good taste’ in tennis. However, circumstances vary and each case should be considered in light of a players record, experience and personality. We all learn through life experiences. In my day character growth was, and I hope is, to be desired. As long as a player makes mistakes along the way and recovers in a way that is positively perceived as character growth, I say, let’s cut him a break and give him a chance to show us he has learned a life lesson. What are your thoughts on the subject?

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Choosing a Doubles Partner

Choosing a Doubles Partner

There are mental,emotional and physical personality traits to consider when choosing a doubles partner. Combining them together with your traits could result in a good or bad doubles combination.

Mental

Does your partner plan the points out or do they prefer to react to the situation. If you are a planner and treat the match as you would a chess game, you might prefer a player of the same mentality. If you don’t like to overthink your strategy and prefer to ‘ad-lib’ or ‘fly by the seat of your pants’ you probably would not like to have your partner analyze each point or game and pre-plan.

Emotional

Does your partner keep everything inside, does not want to be interrupted during the match and plays point after point without talking or discussing what is happening? Or, does your partner talk incessantly and interrupt your train of thought. Communication is key in good doubles. That doesn’t mean you should have a partner that never talks or one that never stops talking. It simply means you should feel comfortable with each others approach and find a common ground.

Physical

Does your partner cover the whole court, including your side? Or, do they constantly shout, “yours’ and want you to cover the whole court. Again, there is no right or wrong, but foot speed and movement is a big part of the game and you need to agree on what to cover. There is not a lot of time during the point to communicate so much of this has to be intrinsic to each players interpretation of what is happening on the court. The physical attributes of each player must be taken into account also. One players ability to serve big and another’s to return big would determine who serves first in the set(s) and which side to return serve from when the other team is serving.

Conclusion

In choosing a partner take into account the mental, emotional, and physical attributes of your ‘would be’ partner. Play a set or two together to see how you get along. You may find you match up on paper, but the chemistry isn’t there on court. Sometimes the most unlikely player ends up being the one you play best as a team with.

What has been your experience.

 

 

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Emotional Toughness in Competition

Emotional Toughness in Competition

There is an emotional toughness in competition that is developed over time.

Emotion – an affective state of consciousness in which joy, sorrow, fear, hat, or the like, is                      experienced, as distinguished from cognitive and volitional states of                                          consciousness.

Developing Emotional Control

When a tennis player develops skills to the point of entering competition another emotional factor enters the picture. The player will have learned the basic techniques, i.e. forehand, backhand, serve, some volley. They would also apply these to various strategy scenarios, i.e. keep the ball in play  one more time than your opponent, cross court rallies are higher percentage, keep the ball deep, etc. However, there is an emotional component that enters the stage when in actual competition. Here, the player has to apply emotional control in situations that may seem out of their control (down 4-0), or visa-versa (up 4-0). If your strategy of being more consistent than the other player isn’t working, or some other form of strategy, emotions can come into play. They can either bring on a panic mode or cause the junior player to try harder. I found the statement, focus of intensity of concentration to apply to these circumstances.

Focus of Intensity of Concentration

Focus – the center of interest or activity.

Let’s take an example. While playing your match you go down 4-0. You realize you have been paying attention to your good practice buddy who is playing two courts over, or, maybe you are thinking about the concert you will be going to with your friends that evening.  You need to block out those interests and activities that are detracting from your focus and narrow it to only your match.

Intensity – the measurable amount of a property,such as force, brightness, or a magnetic field.

In this case the intensity that would be measurable is the score of the set. Let’s take an example. You are up 4-0. Things are under control. Then your opponent closes the gap to 4-1, 4-2,4-3, then 4-4. Now the level of intensity has increased measurably. You need to be aware of the intensity level in a match.

Concentration – the action or power of focusing one’s attention or mental effort.

Concentration can have two elements. One of ‘over’ concentrating, in which case you have to find a way to relax, and the other of being too relaxed in approaching your match. In the one case you have find ways to calm yourself by possibly taking deep breaths, or releasing your mind from overthinking and simplify your approach mentally. In the other you have to start make yourself move faster, think, and react quicker. It is important to find the right mix. This happens over time with experience.

Conclusion

To bring all three into play is to be aware how they interact in a competitive situation and to work at bringing all three into a balance that works in your favor. Do you agree or disagree with this approach?

 

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Begining Player Survival Skills in Tennis

Beginning Player Survival Skills in Tennis

Physical Skills

-Do you have good eye-hand coordination? Holding a 27 inch tennis racket and swinging it to hit an incoming tennis ball requires it.

-Do you have good balance? Moving backwards, forwards, sideways, and diagonally to set yourself up to hit the incoming tennis ball requires it.

-Do you have good reaction time? Hitting or retrieving a hit tennis ball requires you to not only return to a dominant position on your side of the court, but it requires you react to the ball your opponent hits in time to get set up to hit it back.

-Do you have the ability to keep yourself (or improve) your physical condition? A tennis match is on average 40 minutes to an hour and 15 minutes. While there are set time breaks on changeovers and between sets, do you have the stamina to withstand a full tennis match, especially in hotter weather?

Mental Skills

-Do you enjoy solving puzzles? Tennis is like an RPG(role playing game). You have to know your own strengths, weaknesses and your opponents strengths and weaknesses. Come up with a game plan (strategy) to imprint into your opponents mind you have the skills to beat them. Then show them, or not. Either way you are improving your ‘chess’ skills.

Emotional Skills

-Are you emotionally stable in difficult situations? Do you get angry and walk away when things aren’t going your way, or do you assess the situation, control your emotions and use those desires to complete your objective – to play your best. This may mean winning or losing, but either way, you are meeting the challenge and growing in the game.

Conclusion

Entering the arena of beginning tennis requires certain survivor skills that I have only touched on. To desire to compete to the highest level of a professional requires a level in each of the areas listed above that excedes normal expectations. To enjoy tennis doesn’t require that. Find beginning players on your own ‘survival skill’ level that will allow you  considerable enjoyment and ‘fun’ as well as exercise and stress relief.

 

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Getting Control Over Nerves in Tennis

 Control Over Nerves in Tennis

When there is another person across the net from you, whether in warm-up, practice, or a match, it is important to learn techniques for controlling your nerves..

5 Ways to Control Your Nerves

  1. Warm up properly. Take the time beforehand to get your body moving-do some slow stretches, jog a quarter mile, skip some rope, perform some calisthenics,etc. If you have the time, do this an hour before your time on the tennis court. Your mind and body will benefit from this.
  2. In pre-warm up on the tennis court with your partner/opponent  focus on the ball travelling from racket to racket. The nerves you feel with gradually dissipate as you begin to adjust your timing and your movement in accordance with the movement of the ball. You will find yourself adjusting different elements in your game: i.e. your forehand isn’t as comfortable as your backhand, your not tracking the ball as well as you volley at the net, your first serve is smooth and powerful, etc. By focusing on these your nerves will calm as you focus on putting the different elements of your game together for this occasion.
  3. Determine your emotional state. Some days you are too relaxed and need to push yourself to perform at a higher level. This causes you to ‘ramp up’ your physical approach and get the adrenalin flowing. Other days you are too nervous and need to take deep breaths and slow yourself down, forcing yourself to a more relaxed state of play. Exercising control over nerves while playing tennis is extremely important.
  4. Slowly tune out the sounds and action that have nothing to do with your ‘on court’ play. Spectators watching, dogs barking, horns honking, sirens in the distance-all fade away as you submerge yourself in playing your ‘best’ tennis.
  5. Recognize your level of concentration and your opponents. This will help greatly in overcoming your anxiety at certain times. For example, you go up 5-0 in the first set and are cruising. Your opponent, raising the level of his game, gradually turns his 0 into 1,2,3,4, and then 5 games. By now, and hopefully quite a bit before 5-5, you have realized your opponent is concentrating at a higher level and has found a way back into the match. Instead of letting your nerves get the better of you, at this point, you have to analyze what is happening and find a way to counter act it. Focus of intensity of concentration has much to do with this ‘turnaround’. This could turn into a winning experience for you, or a learning experience, as you grow in your practice/match play.

Conclusion

This blog is just touching on how learning to control your nerves before, during and after  practice/match play in tennis, will benefit your having fun playing tennis. I hope you find these helpful and share some of your experiences in ‘controlling’ nerves.

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Approach Shot-Tennis

Approach Shot-Tennis

The approach shot was used much more in the past than it is in todays game.

The ‘Old’ Days

In the ‘old’ days of tennis (i.e. wood tennis rackets, more difference in surfaces,less power, etc.) the approach shot was a viable alternative in most match situations. The player would wait for a short ball, hit it deep (usually down the line with slice) and follow it in to the net. This would set them up for a volley. Of course this would depend on the style of their opponent.  Some players liked the player to come in. They enjoyed the opportunity of hitting a passing shot. Other players didn’t like it when a player came in and challenged them to hit it past them. Players like Pat Rafter, Stephan Edberg and Martina Navratilova all loved coming to net, putting pressure on their opponent, and trying to end the point with a volley.

The “new” Era

Starting in the 90’s the racket technology began to change with the rackets getting stiffer and the stringing technology improving. This caused the game to change in ways that stifled the approach shot as it was known prior to the 90’s. Now a player coming to net had to contend with increased power and spin coming back at him at the net.It changed from the net rushing player having the advantage to the ground stroker at the baseline having the advantage due to the increased speed of the ball coming off the racket and the increased spin on the ball which opened more court to hit the passing shot into. This in turn changed the fundamentals of the ‘old’ approach. Now the attacking player, if he chose to come to net had to be aggressive with his approach, hitting with ferocious power and topspin as opposed to the slower slice.

The game has changed. I liked the old style of setting up your points and anticipating a player attacking a short ball and the foray into the net to see if he could outduel his opponent. Nowadays, there is so much power in the game, fitness enters into the mix and so do injuries. The game is played at such a high velocity now the players tend to stay back and rally back and forth until one makes a mistake. The spectators thrill of seeing which player is going to slice and dice and attack the net is mostly gone with advent of the power and technology in the game today. It is power, power, power.

What are your thoughts? Do you enjoy the power in the game today versus the old strategies that used to be employed?

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